Why Did Video Gamers Uncover Fraud More Easily Than Scientists?

why-did-video-gamers-uncover-fraud-more-easily-than-scientists?

In a recent article at The Atlantic, King’s College psychologist Stuart Ritchie, author of Science Fictions: How Fraud, Bias, Negligence and Hype Undermine the Search for Truth (2020), has noted a curious fact: Video gamers are much quicker to spot fraud than scientists. The video game fraud he focuses on involved a gamer’s claim that … Read more

Emotion Recognition Software Use Spreads While Science Is Doubted

emotion-recognition-software-use-spreads-while-science-is-doubted

An editor at AI Trends notes The global emotion detection and recognition market is projected to grow to $37.1 billion by 2026, up from an estimated $19.5 billion in 2020, according to a recent report from MarketsandMarkets. North America is home to the largest market. John P. Desmond, “Market for Emotion Recognition Projected to Grow … Read more

A Vulnerable System: Fake Papers and Imaginary Scientists

a-vulnerable-system:-fake-papers-and-imaginary-scientists

In the last two posts, we examined how scientific publication has ceased to be a good measure of scientific accomplishment, and how the peer review system is being gamed by unscrupulous publishers and researchers alike. Now, we will continue the discussion on the undermining of scientific publication using two examples: SCIgen and citation counts. SCIgen In 2005 … Read more

Gaming the System: The Flaws in Peer Review

gaming-the-system:-the-flaws-in-peer-review

Last time, we examined how scientific publication has ceased to be a good measure of scientific accomplishment because it has now become a target, following Goodhart’s Law. In today’s post, we will continue that examination by turning to the peer review system, and how that system is being gamed by unscrupulous publishers and researchers alike. … Read more

Publish or Perish — Another Example of Goodhart’s Law

publish-or-perish-—-another-example-of-goodhart’s-law

The linchpin of scientific advances is that scientists publish their findings so that others can learn from them and expand on their insights. This is why some books are rightly considered among the most influential mathematical and scientific books of all time:  Elements, Euclid, c. 300 B.C.Physics, Aristotle, c. 330 B.C.On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres, Nicolaus … Read more